Tecnologia Android

brit:

A Virtual Keyboard for iPad & iPhone

We live in the future. No, seriously, we do. This laser virtual keyboard ($170) is proof of it. It syncs with your iPad or iPhone over bluetooth so that you can type on any surface. Check out the video of it in action.

You can even choose to have simulated keyboard sounds, just in case silent typing isn’t your thing. Can you imagine full school classes or workplaces where everyone is typing on lasers? So crazy. The size of the cube laser device is just a bit larger than a matchbook and the battery lasts for 2.5 hrs. 

I think I might have found the coolest gadget for the holidays. These things will probably sell like hot cakes - I’d snag one early if you’re as excited about it as I am.

(Source: brit, via thenextweb)

thenextweb:

So Who’s Next?
This is a two-pronged question. On one hand, if you’re asking who the next Silicon Valley is, the answer is nobody. You can disagree if you wish, but the very thought that anyone can catch up to 60 years of innovation and drive is laughable at best. But then there’s the other side of this story, where sites such as NYC, Boston and Boulder don’t have to pave their own paths. That pathway has already been set and these other areas are now free to capitalize on them. If you had said, the day after he launch of the iPhone, that you were going to build a business in NYC to make iPhone apps, you’d have been laughed at. Today, that’s a perfectly viable idea, but it is only viable because the Valley was just crazy enough to make an idea like the iPhone work. The other prong to this is a question of what area is going to pop onto the radar next. I’m expecting huge things from Austin in the next couple of years, and not just from the big name side of things. I also expect to see more from the Miami, Florida region, as well as a continued growth in Chicago and my own hang-my-hat of Nashville. Each of these areas is uniquely qualified to succeed in its own way, as long as they don’t get caught up in the idea of being “Silicon” anything. (via An Outsider’s Perspective on the US Tech Hotbeds - The Next Web)

thenextweb:

So Who’s Next?

This is a two-pronged question. On one hand, if you’re asking who the next Silicon Valley is, the answer is nobody. You can disagree if you wish, but the very thought that anyone can catch up to 60 years of innovation and drive is laughable at best. But then there’s the other side of this story, where sites such as NYC, Boston and Boulder don’t have to pave their own paths. That pathway has already been set and these other areas are now free to capitalize on them. If you had said, the day after he launch of the iPhone, that you were going to build a business in NYC to make iPhone apps, you’d have been laughed at. Today, that’s a perfectly viable idea, but it is only viable because the Valley was just crazy enough to make an idea like the iPhone work. The other prong to this is a question of what area is going to pop onto the radar next. I’m expecting huge things from Austin in the next couple of years, and not just from the big name side of things. I also expect to see more from the Miami, Florida region, as well as a continued growth in Chicago and my own hang-my-hat of Nashville. Each of these areas is uniquely qualified to succeed in its own way, as long as they don’t get caught up in the idea of being “Silicon” anything. (via An Outsider’s Perspective on the US Tech Hotbeds - The Next Web)